Home > OneGameAMonth > Reflection

Reflection

The original purpose of this blog was to reflect on my Game Design classes and provide information and help to others teaching game design. However for the past year I’ve been distracted by One Game A Month – a challenge to create one new video game each month of 2013.

I am pleased to say that I completed the challenge and hope to be in the top 10 of participants when the year ends. At time of writing I’ve slipped to position 3 in the top 100 high scores after keeping the top position for over three weeks.

no1

My original aims were to begin creating games with Adobe Flash and by the end of the year have learned enough HTML5 and Javascript to start creating games with those tools. This hasn’t happened unfortunately as the learning curve has been too steep for the short time I’ve had. Still, I managed to create 12 decent, playable games during 2013 and the practice has made me a much quicker programmer, with my last two games taking me only a few hours to create rather than days. Despite that, the games I’m most proud of are actually the ones I created at the start of the year. I had clear plans for these as they were intended to be used as educational games on the King Robert the Bruce website.

One Game A Month will continue in 2014, but at this time I’m not sure how much I will participate. Apparently the focus will be more on creating and updating games rather than making discrete games each month. This may fit in with my own personal plans, as during the next year I aim to create a game for the Android platform and have it available for purchase on Google Play.

For those of you who are interested in my computer games class (I’m teaching NPA Computer Games Development, Level 5), all of my students passed the Game Design unit and are making good progress in the Media Assets unit. Most of the students are working on creating maze-based games in Adobe Flash and one student is working on a 3D game using Blender. Top-down shooter games are the most popular genre this year, with bank heists, prison breaks and zombie survival being the most common themes. My students have been keeping a close eye on my progress in One Game A Month, and at the end of term they gave me a round of applause when they found I’d made it to the number 1 spot in the high scores. It was one of my most treasured moments of 2013, and I hope I can continue inspiring my students throughout their time at college.

Advertisements
  1. Claire
    December 30, 2013 at 3:34 am

    I’m by no means an expert, but while it is important to keep a boundary between your teaching life and your life outside of school, I think it is important to let your students see relevant life examples. For example, you teach the games design course and you’ve let the students see your personal year challenge with game design. By doing this, I find students become more responsive and more willing to try, learn and respect their teachers.
    I applaud your taking on the year long challenge and sharing it with your students. You’ve probably inspired more students than you know. Good luck with your next challenge!

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: